Keynote Abstract: Remembering Aristophanes

“Remembering Aristophanes”

 

The story of Aristophanes’ survival from the original productions of his plays in Athens down to the age of printing is by no means straightforward. Much as we might like to believe (and Aristophanes himself surely would have told us) that the brilliance of his plays in performance is what guaranteed his place in theatrical history and cultural memory, Aristophanes may owe his poetic afterlife more to his choice of comic targets and the moralizing tastes of both scholars and schoolmasters in antiquity than to his poetry and dramatic instincts. Along with all the other Old Comedians he missed out on canonization by the city of Athens in the late 4th-century. Yet he may have been the first poet after Homer to have a commentary written about him. A reading public kept a good selection of his plays alive for four or five centuries after they vanished from the stage. Though we cannot observe the process directly, he then won out in a contest with Menander to be the representative of real Attic Greek in the late antique and Byzantine school curriculum. He was misremembered as a father of satire and more accurately, if also more vaguely, remembered as the progenitor of fantastic and travel narratives.  Lucian’s narrator of a journey to the moon floats by Cloudcuckooland on the way but has no chance to land there—we’ll see if we get any closer on this trip.

Dr. Niall W. Slater, Emory University

Conference Registration

May 1st is coming up fast! If you haven’t registered yet, here’s the information again:

The CNERS 16th Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference is May 1 – 2, 2015 at 6371 Crescent Road, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. If you are planning to attend, please fill out the Conference Registration Form and email completed registration form to:

cners.gradconference.2015@gmail.com

or mail registration form and/or payment to:

Justin Dwyer

Buchanan C227 1866 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z1

5259804464_a41868978e_z

Conference Schedule

Working Program


 

Friday, May 1:  Thea’s Lounge

 

2:30 – 3:00:

Registration

3:00 – 4:30:

Keynote Address by Dr. Niall Slater, “Remembering Aristophanes”

4:30 – 6:00:

Reception at Koerner’s Pub

 

Saturday, May 2:  Thea’s Lounge

 

9:00 – 9:30:

Doors open, coffee

9:30 – 10:45: Panel 1:  Memory and Identity

Ruminari antiquitates:  repeating vs. remembering in Varro

Irene Leonardis, University of Rome 3 and University of Paris 8

Mythic Claims to Territory in the Megarid

Benjamin Winnick, University of Arizona

The Syncretic Synagogical Syntax:  The Hammat Tiberias Synagogue

Courtney Innes, University of British Columbia

 

10:45 – 11:00: Break

 

11:00 – 12:15: Panel 2:  Commemorating the Dead

A Portrait of the Goddess as a Young Girl:

Isiac Imagery in a Funerary Portrait from Roman Egypt at the Cleveland Museum of Art

Molly Phelps, Case Western Reserve University

Yahweh as Divine Caregiver: A Reconsideration of Israelite Ancestor Cult in the Post-exilic Period

Kerry Sonia, Brown University

Remembrance and Memory in Callimachus’ Fr. 64 Pf.

Gabriele Busnelli, University of Cincinnati

 

12:15 – 1:00: Lunch

 

1:00 – 2:15: Panel 3:  Appropriating the Past

Effigies and Exorcisms:  Rituals to Purify Patients and Expel Hostile Spirits in Greece and the Near East

Ryan Johnson, University of British Columbia

Cremutius Cordus and the Media of Memory:  Tacitus’ Annals 4.34-35

Daniel Libatique, Boston University

Poetic Manipulation of the Emperor’s Position on the Literary and Urban Landscape

Joshua Hartman, University of Washington

2:15 – 2:30: Break

2:30 – 3:15: Panel 4:  Selective Memory in the Ancient World

True in Hindsight:  Selective Memory in Pindar’s Olympian Odes

Hilary Bouxsein, University of Virginia

Making and Breaking History:  Damnatio Memoriae on Roman Imperial Reliefs

Fae Amiro, McMaster University

Latin and Etruscan Cultural Appropriation in Livy

Lauren Tomanelli, Columbia University

3:15 – 3:30: Closing Remarks

 

Conference Registration is Now Open

The CNERS 16th Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference is May 1 – 2, 2015 at 6371 Crescent Road, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. If you are planning to attend, please fill out the Conference Registration Form and email completed registration form to:

cners.gradconference.2015@gmail.com

or mail registration form and/or payment to:

Justin Dwyer

Buchanan C227 1866 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z1

 

CFP: Total Recall: The Manipulation of Memory in the Ancient World

The Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies at the University of British Columbia is proud to present their 16th Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference.  The Conference will be held at UBC’s Thea’s Lounge on May 1st and 2nd, 2015, with a keynote address by Professor Niall Slater of Emory University.  This year’s theme is Memory.

The purpose of the conference is to provide graduate students and senior undergraduates from a variety of disciplines with the opportunity to present original research in a less formal and more intimate setting than may be found in typical academic conferences.   In previous years we have attracted emerging scholars from across Canada and the United States.  We look forward to a variety of disciplinary perspectives and interpretations on this interesting and relevant subject matter.

We invite submissions for papers related to the theme of Memory.  This broad topic bridges time and discipline, finding relevance in both the ancient and modern worlds, and in areas of the arts, social sciences, and sciences.  Relevant topics include (but are certainly not limited to):

 

  • The Politics of Memory
  • Commemorative Remembrance in Literature, Art, and Architecture
  • The Memory of Warfare & Military Exploits
  • Oblivion & the Loss of Memory in Textual and Archaeological Contexts
  • Allusion & Imitation as Agents of Memory
  • Memory in Philosophical & Religious Thought
  • Cognitive Science and the Ancient World
  • Memory as a Discipline (Theory & Methodology)
  • Cultural and Social Memory
  • Memory and the Oral Tradition

 

If you are interested in presenting a paper at the conference, please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words by Friday January 23, 2015.  Please include your name, institution, degree program, specialization, and contact info, as well as any audio-visual equipment you may require. Presentations should be no more than 20 minutes in length.  All faculties and disciplines are encouraged to apply.

Please send submissions and any further inquiries to the Conference Coordinator:

Justin Dwyer, cners.gradconference.2015@gmail.com

We look forward to seeing you at the conference!

The Conference organizers would like to thank their sponsors, in particular
the Department of CNERS, the Graduate Student Society (GSS), and the Faculty of Graduate Studies.